AltBib.Com Bibliography for #180. The Chernobyl Question :
Showing All 24 Matching Links Found
+ Show/Hide Search Tools and Options
Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:01:32
1/1/2011  Second Harvest Japan
An organization that collects unsaleable foods from manufacturers and donors and donates them to those in need. They are currently helping to distribute food and supplies to those who have been effected by the earthquake.
posted: 4/4/11                   0       0
#1 
keywords: Add New Keyword To Link



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:01:40
1/1/2011  Peace Boat
A Japan-based NGO that is currently helping to distribute food and supplies and cook meals for those in the earthquake-stricken areas of Japan.
posted: 4/4/11                   0       0
#2 
keywords: Add New Keyword To Link



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:01:57
Video demonstrating what Peace Boat is doing to help those in Northeast Japan. Includes very moving interview with a man who lost his mother and aunt in the tsunami.
3/28/2011  Tsunami hit city of Ishinomaki, Japan, 2 weeks later
Peace Boat sends a team of volunteers to help with the ongoing support in Ishinomaki city, which was devastated by the Tsunami. Here is a link to the peace boat website where you can find out more info on how to help and or donate! Lets act now!!
(Peace Boat)
posted: 4/4/11      
            
0       9
#3 
keywords: Ishinomaki, Japan, Nuclear Power Plants, Peace Boat, Tsunamis Add New Keyword To Link



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:03:27
Japan Declares Nuclear Emergency at Plant - Early report on the Fukushima crisis from NHK.
3/11/2011  Japan Declares Nuclear Emergency at Plant, Releasing Radioactive Steam Vapor (NHK)
posted: 4/4/11      
            
0       7
#4 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:03:54
Report on the initial declaration of emergency at Fukushima on March 11th broadcast on Al-Jazeera.
3/11/2011  Japan Declares "Nuclear Emergency Situation" (Al-jazeera)
posted: 4/4/11      
            
0       7
#5 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:04:28
An early report on an explosion at Fukushima from Al-Jazeera.
3/12/2011  Explosion at nuclear plant in Japan (Al-jazeera)
posted: 4/4/11      
            
0       7
#6 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:05:02
Nuclear Expert On Explosion At Japanese Nuclear Power Plant.
3/12/2011  This Is Not Good! This Is NOT Good! Joseph Cirincione On Explosion At Japanese Nuclear Power Plant (FOX)
posted: 4/4/11      
            
0       7
#7 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:05:32
Tension grows in the Tokyo metropolis.
3/29/2011  Nuclear crisis deepens in Japan
Tension grows in the Tokyo metropolis. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano has now admitted that a partial meltdown has taken place at one of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors, and this is a cause of the relatively high levels of radiation escaping from the plant. Critics have been pouncing on the sluggish communications from the government.
(Press TV)
posted: 4/4/11      
            
0       9
#8 
keywords: Earthquakes, Fukushima, Japan, Japanese Ministry Of Defense, Nuclear Power Plants, Robert Peter Gale, Tokyo Electric Power CO, Tsunamis Add New Keyword To Link



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:08:23
Cryptogon reports on 1000 mSv/hr radiation in the air in reactor no. 2.
4/3/2011  FUKUSHIMA: 1,000 MILLISIEVERTS PER HOUR IN THE AIR INSIDE THE PIT OF REACTOR TWO
Update: Japanese Turn to Paper and Sawdust to Plug Fukushima Nuclear Leak [???] - Via: Guardian: Where concrete has failed to prevent highly radioactive water pouring into the sea, workers at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant have shifted hope of plugging the leaks to an absorbent polymer mixed with sawdust and shredded newspaper that expands 50-fold when in contact with water. Although officials conceded the polymer had made little impact so far, they will wait until Monday before deciding whether to abandon it. “We were hoping the polymers would function like diapers, but we have yet to see a visible effect,” said Hidehiko Nishiyama, spokesman for Japan’s nuclear safety agency. Officials separately has warned that the nuclear crisis could drag on for months, the first time that they have offered a timescale. Goshi Hosono, an aide to the prime minister, Naoto Kan, said everything possible was being done to contain leaks, which have contaminated the environment and food and water supplies, necessitated mass evacuations, and fomented fear as far away as Tokyo, 150 miles to the south. —End Update— I’ve become very hesitant to post any information that originates from the criminals at TEPCO, but this number (1,000 mSv/hour) has remained standing for over a day now. According to the IAEA, the limit for public radiation exposure is 1 mSv per year: The dose limits for practices are intended to ensure that no individual is committed to unacceptable risk due to radiation exposure. For the public the limit is 1 mSv in a year, or in special circumstances up to 5 mSv in a single year provided that the average does over five consecutive years does not exceed 1 mSv per year. At Fukushima, they’re dealing with 1,000 mSv/hour.
(Cryptogon)
posted: 4/4/11                   0       8
#9 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:09:37
1/1/2011  Yearly radiation dosages in Sieverts
Yearly dose examples * Living near a nuclear power station: 0.0001–0.01 mSv/year[9][11] * Living near a coal power station: 0.0003 mSv/year[11] * Sleeping next to a human for 8 hours every night: 0.02 mSv/yr[11] * Cosmic radiation (from sky) at sea level: 0.24 mSv/year[9] * Terrestrial radiation (from ground): 0.28 mSv/year[9] * Natural radiation in the human body: 0.40 mSv/year[9] * Radiation produced by the granite of the United States Capitol building: 0.85 mSv/year[16] * Average individual background radiation dose: 2 mSv/year; 1.5 mSv/year for Australians, 3.0 mSv/year for Americans[11][6][12] * Atmospheric sources (mostly radon): 2 mSv/year[9][17] * Total average radiation dose for Americans: 6.2 mSv/year[18] * New York-Tokyo flights for airline crew: 9 mSv/year[12] * Smoking 1.5 packs/day: 13-60 mSv/year[16][17] * Current average limit for nuclear workers: 20 mSv/year[12] * Background radiation in parts of Iran, India and Europe: 50 mSv/year[12] * Elevated annual regulatory limit for workers during Fukushima emergency: 250 mSv/year[19] [edit] Dose limit examples * Criterion for relocation after Chernobyl disaster: 350 mSv/lifetime[12] * In most countries the current maximum permissible dose to radiation workers is 20 mSv per year averaged over five years, with a maximum of 50 mSv in any one year. This is over and above background exposure, and excludes medical exposure. The value originates from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and is coupled with the requirement to keep exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) – taking into account social and economic factors.[20] * Public dose limits for exposure from uranium mining or nuclear plants are usually set at 1 mSv/yr above background.[20]
(Wikipedia)
posted: 4/4/11                   0       5
#10 
keywords: Chernobyl, International Commission On Radiological Protection, Nuclear Power Plants, Nuclear Weapons Add New Keyword To Link



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:10:49
Greenpeace identifies evacuation-level radiation dosages outside of the government-mandated evacuation zone.
3/27/2011  Greenpeace radiation team pinpoints need to extend Fukushima evacuation zone
Need to protect pregnant women and children - Greenpeace radiation experts have confirmed radiation levels of up to ten micro Sieverts per hour (1) in Iitate village, 40km northwest of the crisis-stricken Fukushima/Daiichi nuclear plant, and 20km (2) beyond the official evacuation zone. These levels are high enough to require evacuation. “The Japanese authorities are fully aware (3) that high levels of radiation from the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant have spread far beyond the official evacuation zone to places like Iitate, yet are still not taking action to properly protect people or keep them informed them about the risks to their health”, said Greenpeace radiation safety expert Jan van de Putte. “It is clearly not safe for people to remain in Iitate, especially children and pregnant women, when it could mean receiving the maximum allowed annual dose of radiation in only a few days. When further contamination from possible ingestion or inhalation of radioactive particles is factored in, the risks are even higher.” “The authorities must stop choosing politics over science and determine evacuation zones around the Fukushima nuclear plant that reflect the radiation levels being found in the environment. In addition to coming clean on the true dangers of the current nuclear crisis, the smartest move for Japan and governments around the world is heavily invest in energy efficiency, and redouble their efforts to harness safe and secure renewable energy sources.”
(Greenpeace)
posted: 4/4/11                   0       9
#11 
keywords: Alternative Energy, Belgium, Earthquakes, France, Fukushima, Greenpeace, Jacob Namminga, Jan Van De Putte, Japan, Netherlands, Nuclear Power Plants, Russia, Spain, Technical University Of Delft, Tsunamis, Ukraine Add New Keyword To Link



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:11:55
1/1/2008  The True Battle of Chernobyl Uncensored
A good documentary about Chernobyl and about what has now been revealed about what officials knew about the disaster and have kept secret for decades.
posted: 4/4/11                   0       0
#12 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:13:13
8/17/2004  Seconds From Disaster -- S01E07 -- Meltdown In Chernobyl
Sensationalistic National Geographic “documentary” about the disaster…but it has nice graphics.
(National Geographic)
posted: 4/4/11      
            
0       2
#13 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:16:42
A good overview of some of the Fukushima/Chernobyl differences.
3/18/2011  Six Ways Fukushima is Not Chernobyl
The crisis at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi has already been dubbed the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl, and the situation there continues to worsen. But along with references to the "ch-word," as one nonproliferation expert put it [1], experts have been quick to provide reasons why the Daiichi crisis will not be "the next Chernobyl." Experts have noted several key differences in the design of the reactors in question, as well as in the government's reaction to the crisis: 1. Chernobyl's reactor had no containment structure. The RBMK reactor at Chernobyl "was regarded as the workhorse of Soviet atomic energy, thrifty and reliable -- and safe enough to be built without an expensive containment building that would prevent the release of radiation in the event of a serious accident," The Guardian's Adam Higginbotham noted [2]. As a result, when a reactor exploded on April 26, 1986, the radioactive material inside went straight into the atmosphere [3]. Fukushima's reactors [4] are surrounded by steel-and-concrete containment structures [5]. However, as the New York Times reported Tuesday, the General Electric Mark 1 reactors at Fukushima have "a comparatively smaller and less expensive containment structure [6]" that has drawn criticism from American regulators. In a 1972 memo [7], a safety official suggested that the design presented serious risks and should be discontinued. One primary concern, the Times reported, was that in an incident of cooling failure -- the kind Fukushima's reactors are now undergoing -- the containment structures might burst, releasing the radioactive material they are supposed to keep in check.
(ProPublica)
posted: 4/4/11                   0       9
#14 
keywords: Adam Higginbotham, Berlarus, Cancer, Carbon Dioxide, Chernobyl, Colin Brown, Earthquakes, European Commission, Fukushima, Institution Of Mechanical Engineers, Japan, John Beddington, Lois Beckett, London Guardian, Los Angeles Times, Nieman Journalism Lab, Nikolai Titenok, Nitrogen, Nuclear Power Plants, Pripyat, Russia, Shan Nair, Sweden, The New York Times, Tsunamis, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United Nations, Uranium, Vladimir Pravik, Water Add New Keyword To Link



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:19:22
Calming words for those who are afraid of a new Chernobyl.
3/29/2011  Why Fukushima Isn’t Like Chernobyl
Despite media hype about the radiation dangers, the Fukushima nuclear crisis won't end like Chernobyl, Alexander Sich tells The Diplomat. Is the kind of massive radiation release that occurred with Chernobyl possible at the Fukushima plant? No, it can’t have that kind of massive release. It simply can’t do that. The question is to what extent the zirconium alloy, which clads the fuel pellets, is damaged in the core, and how much of the fuel has failed. And I don’t necessarily mean melted, I mean failed. There’s been an ambiguous use of the word ‘melting’ applied to the core. But when people talk about meltdown, they should be very specific about what they mean by the word.
(The Diplomat)
posted: 4/4/11                   0       9
#15 
keywords: Alexander Sich, Australia, Boiling Water Reactor, Chernobyl, City College Of New York, Earthquakes, Ed Markey, Franciscan University Of Steubenville, Fukushima, Iodine, Japan, Kiev, Massachusetts, Michio Kaku, Nuclear Power Plants, Nuclear Weapons, Ohio, Philippines, Russia, String Theory, Three Mile Island, Tsunamis, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Western Light Water Reactor, Windscale Fire, Zirconium Add New Keyword To Link



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:21:31
Water with high levels of radiation has been confirmed to have seeped into the sea from the No. 2 reactor at the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, government officials said Saturday, raising wider fears of environmental contamination by the release of radioactivity.
4/3/2011  Tainted water confirmed to have seeped into sea from nuke plant
Water with high levels of radiation has been confirmed to have seeped into the sea from the No. 2 reactor at the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, government officials said Saturday, raising wider fears of environmental contamination by the release of radioactivity. The water has been leaking into the sea from a 20-centimeter crack detected at a pit in the reactor where power cables are stored, the government's nuclear safety agency said. Tokyo Electric Power Co. took steps to encase the fracture in concrete as an emergency measure but the utility said later that the amount of leakage was unchanged even after the measure was taken. The utility, known as TEPCO, said the pit is connected to the No. 2 reactor's turbine building and a tunnel-like underground trench, in which highly radioactive water has been spotted so far.
(Kyodo News)
posted: 4/4/11                   0       8
#16 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:22:11
Worrying sign from Reactor No. 3.
3/25/2011  Fukushima Reactor No. 3 suffers likely core breach, now leaking water at 10,000 times normal radiation levels
The Fukushima situation took a turn for the worse today as two nuclear repair workers stepped into some water at Reactor No. 3 and suffered severe radiation burns requiring immediate hospitalization. The water, it turns out, measures 10,000 times normal radiation levels, and it appears to be leaking from the core of Reactor No. 3. If confirmed, this can only mean one thing: A containment breach that now risks the spewing of enormous quantities of radiation into the environment, easily dwarfing the releases from Chernobyl in 1986. Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan had some somber words for the world press, saying "The situation today at the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant is still very grave and serious. We must remain vigilant. We are not in a position where we can be optimistic. We must treat every development with the utmost care." (http://apnews.myway.com/article/201...) "Even if there has been encouraging news such as getting some power back to the site, the installation remains in an extremely precarious and very serious situation that has not yet been stabilized" said Thomas Houdre from France's nuclear safety agency (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/print...).
(Natural News)
posted: 4/4/11                   0       9
#17 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:23:22
Climate change hoax mouthpiece defends his religion by worshipping nuclear.
3/21/2011  Why Fukushima made me stop worrying and love nuclear power
Japan's disaster would weigh more heavily if there were less harmful alternatives. Atomic power is part of the mix - You will not be surprised to hear that the events in Japan have changed my view of nuclear power. You will be surprised to hear how they have changed it. As a result of the disaster at Fukushima, I am no longer nuclear-neutral. I now support the technology. A crappy old plant with inadequate safety features was hit by a monster earthquake and a vast tsunami. The electricity supply failed, knocking out the cooling system. The reactors began to explode and melt down. The disaster exposed a familiar legacy of poor design and corner-cutting. Yet, as far as we know, no one has yet received a lethal dose of radiation. Some greens have wildly exaggerated the dangers of radioactive pollution. For a clearer view, look at the graphic published by xkcd.com. It shows that the average total dose from the Three Mile Island disaster for someone living within 10 miles of the plant was one 625th of the maximum yearly amount permitted for US radiation workers. This, in turn, is half of the lowest one-year dose clearly linked to an increased cancer risk, which, in its turn, is one 80th of an invariably fatal exposure. I'm not proposing complacency here. I am proposing perspective. If other forms of energy production caused no damage, these impacts would weigh more heavily. But energy is like medicine: if there are no side-effects, the chances are that it doesn't work.
(London Guardian)
posted: 4/4/11                   0       9
#18 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:24:50
A post that blatantly lies about fatalities to make nuclear sound safer than it is.
3/14/2011  Nuclear power perspective
There is no question that the events in Japan are ongoing and serious. That said, I believe a lot of people are being misled by much of the news coverage. Take a look at these headlines from the Christian Science Monitor and from Channel News Asia, respectively, Japan's radiation leak: Shades of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl? and, US experts fear 'Chernobyl-like' crisis for Japan "Three Mile Island" and "Chernobyl" sounds scary, right? Let me ask a couple of questions? How many were killed by the Three Mile Island incident? 100? 10,000? 100,000? Answer? None. None of the plant workers were killed and no one in the surrounding area.
(Meteorological Musings)
posted: 4/4/11                   0       7
#19 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:26:10
26:10
1/1/2011  Janette Sherman
A toxicologist and contributing editor to a new scientific study showing nearly 1 million deaths attributable directly to Chernobyl.
posted: 4/4/11                   0       0
#20 
keywords: Add New Keyword To Link



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:27:09
A fascinating discussion about the medical data showing 985,000 people have died as a result of Chernobyl.
1/1/2011  Chernobyl: A Million Casualties
A million people have died so far as a result of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear plant accident, explains Janette Sherman, M.D., toxicologist and contributing editor of the book Chernobyl: Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment. Published by the New York Academy of Sciences, the book, authored by Dr. Alexey Yablokov, Dr. Vassily Nesterenko and Dr. Alexey Nesterenko, examined medical records now available--which expose as a lie the claim of the International Atomic Energy Commission that perhaps 4,000 people may die as a result of Chernobyl. Enviro Close-Up # 610 (29 mintes)
posted: 4/5/11                   0       0
#21 
keywords: Alexey Nesterenko, Alexey Yablokov, Chernobyl, International Atomic Energy Commission, Janette Sherman, Karl Grossman, New York Academy Of Sciences, Nuclear Power Plants, Vassily Nesterenko Add New Keyword To Link



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:35:31
Excellent documentary about what the scientists and “liquidators” at Chernobyl did to research, understand, and solve the problems of Chernobyl.
1/1/2009  Inside Chernobyl's Sarcophagus
Follow up to the 1991 documentary. In this episode we follow a group of soviet scientists on a suicide mission as they search for the missing nuclear fuel inside the remains of reactor 4.
(BBC)
posted: 4/5/11                   0       0
#22 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:43:10
1/1/2011  Citizens' Nuclear Information Center
Based in Tokyo, the CNIC is a network of scientists, activists, and common citizens who work to create a nuclear free world.
posted: 4/5/11                   0       0
#23 



Corbett Report: #180. The Chernobyl Question time reference: 00:47:08
Some of the world’s largest cement pumps were en route to Japan’s stricken nuclear plant on Thursday, initially to help douse areas with water but eventually for cement work — including the possibility of entombing the site as was done in Chernobyl.
4/1/2011  Japan: Same Type of Concrete Pumping Trucks Used at Chernobyl Are En-route to Fukushima
Via: MSNBC: Some of the world’s largest cement pumps were en route to Japan’s stricken nuclear plant on Thursday, initially to help douse areas with water but eventually for cement work — including the possibility of entombing the site as was done in Chernobyl. Operated via remote control, one of the truck-mounted pumps was already at the Fukushima Dai-ichi site and being used to spray water. Four more will be flown in from Germany and the United States, according to the German-manufacturer Putzmeister. The biggest of the five has an arm that extends well over 200 feet. “Initially, they will probably pump water,” Putzmeister stated. “Later they will be used for any necessary concreting work.” A construction company in Augusta, Ga., was among those redirecting the pumps to Japan. Its owner said he believes building a concrete sarcophagus will follow. “Our understanding is they are preparing to go to next phase and it will require a lot of concrete,” Jerry Ashmore told the Augusta Chronicle.
(Cryptogon)
posted: 4/5/11                   0       8
#24 
keywords: Augusta Chronicle, Augusta GA, Chernobyl, Earthquakes, Fukushima, Germany, Japan, Jerry Ashmore, Msnbc, Nuclear Power Plants, Putzmeister, Tsunamis, Ukraine, United States Add New Keyword To Link




Showing All 24 Matching Links Found